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Extended geomagnetic storm forecast ahead of available solar wind measurements

Podladchikova T. V., A. A. Petrukovich, (2012), Extended geomagnetic storm forecast ahead of available solar wind measurements, J. Space Weather Space Clim., 10, doi:10.1029/2012SW000786

Abstract

We develop a technique to predict geomagnetic storm magnitudes (peak Dst values) several hours in advance using the first indications of extreme solar wind conditions, as well as an assumption of constant driving function V Bs. For larger storms with clear V Bs jump we predict lower and upper limits of expected peak Dst. For smaller storms and storms with gradually increasing V Bs we predict Dst several hours ahead. The data from 1995–2010 were used to design the technique. The actual advance time of reliable forecasts (before the peak value is reached) is on average 5–6 hours, illustrating the realistic horizon of such “constant input” assumption. Larger storms are developing faster and thus are better predicted. False warnings (predictions more than 25% larger than the actual peak) occur in about 10% of events. The algorithm is implemented in real-time in Space Research Institute, Moscow (www.spaceweather.ru)

Authors (sorted by name)

Petrukovich Podladchikova

Journal / Conference

J. Space Weather Space Clim.

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to the National Space Science Data Center for the OMNI 2 database, to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for ACE real‐time solar wind (RTSW) data, to the WDC for Geomagnetism (Kyoto) for the Dst index data and to the referees for helpful comments. The work was partially supported by Microsoft Research (joint project “Short‐term space weather forecast”) and Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project 09‐05‐90900.

Grants

09‐05‐90900

Bibtex

@article{doi:10.1029/2012SW000786,
author = {Podladchikova, T. V. and Petrukovich, A. A.},
title = {Extended geomagnetic storm forecast ahead of available solar wind measurements},
journal = {Space Weather},
year ={2012},
volume = {10},
number = {7},
pages = {},
keywords = {space weather},
doi = {10.1029/2012SW000786},
url = {https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2012SW000786},
eprint = {https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1029/2012SW000786},
abstract = {We develop a technique to predict geomagnetic storm magnitudes (peak Dst values) several hours in advance using the first indications of extreme solar wind conditions, as well as an assumption of constant driving function V Bs. For larger storms with clear V Bs jump we predict lower and upper limits of expected peak Dst. For smaller storms and storms with gradually increasing V Bs we predict Dst several hours ahead. The data from 1995–2010 were used to design the technique. The actual advance time of reliable forecasts (before the peak value is reached) is on average 5–6 hours, illustrating the realistic horizon of such “constant input” assumption. Larger storms are developing faster and thus are better predicted. False warnings (predictions more than 25% larger than the actual peak) occur in about 10% of events. The algorithm is implemented in real-time in Space Research Institute, Moscow (www.spaceweather.ru)}
}