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Dependence of plasmaspheric hiss on solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity and modeling of its global distribution

Kim K., D. Lee, Y. Shprits, (2015), Dependence of plasmaspheric hiss on solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity and modeling of its global distribution, J. of Geophys. Res. [Space Physics], 120, 1153-1167, doi:10.1002/2014JA020687

Abstract

Abstract Accurate knowledge of the global distribution of plasmaspheric hiss is essential for the radiation belt modeling because it provides a direct link to understanding the radiation belt loss in the slot region. In this paper, we study the dependence of hiss activity on solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity indices using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms hiss measurements made from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2012 based on a correlation analysis. We find that hiss amplitudes are well correlated with the preceding solar wind speed VSW, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) BZ, and interplanetary electric field (IEF) EY with delay times of 5–6 h for VSW and 3–4 h for IMF BZ and IEF EY, while the best correlation with the geomagnetic indices, AE, Kp, and SYM-H, occurs at a delay time of 2–3 h for AE and SYM-H and 3–4 h for Kp. Of the solar wind parameters, the dawn-to-dusk component of IEF EY yields the best correlation with the variation of hiss wave. More interestingly, the global distribution of hiss waves shows a significant dependence on the VSW and IMF BZ: the most intense hiss region tends to occur at prenoon sector for a more southward IMF BZ, while the tendency is opposite with increasing VSW. This implies different origins of hiss activity. Also, we employ an artificial neural network technique to develop models of the global distribution of hiss amplitudes based on the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. The solely solar wind parameter-based model generally results in a higher correlation between the measured and modeled hiss amplitudes than any other models based on the geomagnetic indices. Finally, we use the solar wind parameter-based model to investigate hiss activity during storm events by distinguishing between coronal mass ejection-driven storms and corotating interaction region-driven storms. The result shows that in spite of the differences in the behavior of solar wind parameters between the two storm groups, the different types of storms lead to the similar evolution of hiss waves in overall appearance even though the detailed behavior of hiss activations are different.

Authors (sorted by name)

Kim Shprits

Journal / Conference

Journal Of Geophysical Research (Space Physics)

Acknowledgments

We thank NASA contract NAS5‐02099 and V. Angelopoulos for use of data from THEMIS Mission. Specifically, we thank O. Le Contel and A. Roux for use of SCM data. We thank the GSFC/SPDF OMNIWeb for the provision of the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity indices used in this report. We also thank Jung‐Hee Cho for providing data for the plasmapause locations. The data used for this paper are available from the corresponding author (kckim@kasi.re.kr) upon request. This work was supported by “Planetary system research for space exploration” project and basic research funding from KASI. The work at Chungbuk National University was supported by an NSL grant (2011‐0030742) of the National Research Foundation of Korea. Y.Y.S. would like to acknowledge NSF AGS‐1203747, NASA NNX13AE34G, and UC Lab Fee grant.

Grants

AGS‐1203747 NAS5‐02099 NNX13AE34G

Bibtex

@article{doi:10.1002/2014JA020687,
author = {Kim, Kyung-Chan and Lee, Dae-Young and Shprits, Yuri},
title = {Dependence of plasmaspheric hiss on solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity and modeling of its global distribution},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics},
volume = {120},
number = {2},
pages = {1153-1167},
year ={2015},
keywords = {plasmaspheric hiss, radiation belts, empirical modeling, geomagnetic storms, artificial neural network},
doi = {10.1002/2014JA020687},
url = {https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/2014JA020687},
eprint = {https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/2014JA020687},
abstract = {Abstract Accurate knowledge of the global distribution of plasmaspheric hiss is essential for the radiation belt modeling because it provides a direct link to understanding the radiation belt loss in the slot region. In this paper, we study the dependence of hiss activity on solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity indices using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms hiss measurements made from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2012 based on a correlation analysis. We find that hiss amplitudes are well correlated with the preceding solar wind speed VSW, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) BZ, and interplanetary electric field (IEF) EY with delay times of 5–6 h for VSW and 3–4 h for IMF BZ and IEF EY, while the best correlation with the geomagnetic indices, AE, Kp, and SYM-H, occurs at a delay time of 2–3 h for AE and SYM-H and 3–4 h for Kp. Of the solar wind parameters, the dawn-to-dusk component of IEF EY yields the best correlation with the variation of hiss wave. More interestingly, the global distribution of hiss waves shows a significant dependence on the VSW and IMF BZ: the most intense hiss region tends to occur at prenoon sector for a more southward IMF BZ, while the tendency is opposite with increasing VSW. This implies different origins of hiss activity. Also, we employ an artificial neural network technique to develop models of the global distribution of hiss amplitudes based on the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. The solely solar wind parameter-based model generally results in a higher correlation between the measured and modeled hiss amplitudes than any other models based on the geomagnetic indices. Finally, we use the solar wind parameter-based model to investigate hiss activity during storm events by distinguishing between coronal mass ejection-driven storms and corotating interaction region-driven storms. The result shows that in spite of the differences in the behavior of solar wind parameters between the two storm groups, the different types of storms lead to the similar evolution of hiss waves in overall appearance even though the detailed behavior of hiss activations are different.}
}